Showing posts with label j k rowling. Show all posts
Showing posts with label j k rowling. Show all posts


Book Style + Review: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Harry Potter And The Cursed Child
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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, inspired by an original story by J. K. Rowling is the subject of today's Book Style. I'm going to talk about the book below in more detail, since it's a bit spoiler heavy, so let's jump right into the Book Style.

A pair of black Harry's jeans and a vibrant "Ginny" tank form the base. On top I've added a "Stockholm Syndrome" cardigan for an extra witchy vibe and because I have some feels about how Delphi was raised. A pair of magical "Scorpius" sneakers and a "Magic Touch" hat will keep the tip and the toes covered. For jewelry I added a "Rubber & Magic" ring, a serpent arm band, an Augurey-inspired feather necklace, and a pair of skull earrings. For accessories I chose a "Witch Craft" clutch, a black magic phone case, and a pair of "B'witched" sunglasses to hide that evil gleam in your eyes. The final touch is a bit of sparkly "Dirty Baby" nail lacquer.

Okay, onto my thoughts about Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. Careful, SPOILERS ahead!

I won't be the first person to proclaim that Harry Potter and the Cursed Child gave me a lot of mixed feelings. Unlike some people, I'm okay with the story continuing. I'm even okay with the play as a whole - even if I wish it wasn't ONLY a play. Losing Jo's voice, as integral to the world of Harry Potter as the Boy Who Lived, himself, is a bit of a blow to the emotional depth of the story. And reading a play always means experiencing less character insight than a novel allows. We are suddenly stripped of the inner monologues, the nuanced emotions, the narrative point of view. If I saw Harry Potter and the Cursed Child live in London, I believe that I wouldn't be mourning this lack of intimacy. I like to think I'm blessed with a fairly creative imagination and Jack Thorne's stage direction allowed me to get a sense of what being in the theater would actually be like, but reading it on paper is cold. I would recommend really looking at the cast and performance photos ahead of time to help envision the characters better. I will admit that picturing them as the overdone "aged" versions from the final film never worked well for me. With the lack of physical descriptions in the script, I found it easier to see them that way.

What I do love about the direction that Jo guided Thorne and John Tiffany in is that the play addresses a few of the qualms I had with her original ending. They are able to add a bit more depth to Dumbledore and Snape by acknowledging that while admirable in their sacrifices, they were deeply flawed humans. I'm still not sure how I feel about Voldemort and Bellatrix getting it on. I know Bellatrix would've been all about it, but Voldemort always struck me as being incredibly asexual. I can't picture him getting off on anything but power and cruelty. Maybe the were into BDSM. Or maybe they used some sort of magical in vitro to produce an heir of the Heir of Slytherin. So, that's weird. I hate that Delphi misses out on an opportunity at being a more three dimensional character by being introduced in a play and losing out on us seeing her better. Not thrilled that there's an air of being desperate for daddy's approval, either. I feel like making her evil in her own right would have been a better move. Voldemort's heir would surely want power for herself in her father's absence, not to bring him back to power. Maybe if they'd elaborated on her background more and her upbringing and how much indoctrination she had actually been subjected to. Ah, if wishes were horses... All in all, I am glad I read it and I enjoyed dipping my toes back into the magical world of Harry, Ron and Hermione.

If you're on the fence about this one, I would recommend it with a couple of caveats: Remember it's a play. Remember that it isn't a story about Harry, it's a story about Albus and Scorpius.


Character Style: Hermione Jean Granger

Hermione Jean Granger

Trying something new out today: Character Styles! For my first trip down this dangerous new rabbit hole of inspiration, I went with Hermione from the Harry Potter. Only fitting since I'm in the midst of my Harry Potter Book Style series. 

Hermione is whip-smart and shares my overwhelming need to impart her knowledge on the less informed. (I'm sorry, I know it comes off as being a bossy know-it-all, but we just can't help ourselves.) She's also always concerned for the welfare of innocents and less powerful magical creatures and believes in equality with a ferocity I admire. I think she would be a pretty fierce environmentalist, even if she doesn't natural gravitate towards Herbology. She's also, definitely, a bonafide #feministkilljoy!

Physically, she has a rather unruly head of brown curls that she often wears loose or restrains in a braid. For special occasions she has been known to go through the effort of straightening it out into sleek updo's. Her brown eyes are usually buried in a book; the library is one of her favorite haunts. She's more concerned with studies than fashion, so her (off-duty) wardrobe is a mix of casual basics. Comfy t-shirts, oversized sweaters and hoodies. Denim and practical footwear. When she does dress up, for the Yule Ball or Bill & Fleur's wedding, she favors shades of lilac and periwinkle and stuns in simple silhouettes and jewelry. She would, of course, always have a watch on her, can't be late after all. I've never pictured Hermione being particularly fussed about makeup, either. Natural look at most. She's definitely always got a book on her, though. 


Book Style: Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban

Harry Potter And The Prisoner Of Azkaban

For the third Potter book, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, I wanted to do a lady-Sirius. As flawed as Sirius is as a character - I mean he makes Harry look like a downright calm, rational planner - I do still love and feel for him. The sacrifices he made out of loyalty to James are heart-wrenching. This outfit is less Sirius-post-Azkaban and more how I imagine a teenage girl version of Sirius would dress!

Of course I stuck with the motorcycle aesthetic. We have to annoy mum somehow! A pair of skinnies in "Grim Shadows Grey" tuck right into a pair of "Remus" boots. On top we'll toss on a witches tee under a "Shaggy Dog" sweater. Slip into a rebelliously bright motorcycle jacket and cinch your waist with a "Prisoner" belt before we move on and discuss accessories. 

A "Sirius" bracelet for your wrist and a rat ring for your fingers. "Moon Phase" earrings will add a bit of sparkle to your ears while a stag necklace will show the whole school where your true loyalties lie. Lacquer up your nails with "Shattered Souls" gold glitter polish and grab a "Stag" bag to hold all your books contraband and the marauders' map. Now off to the Shrieking Shack you go, Lupin is waiting for his pals.


Book Style: Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets

Harry Potter And The Chamber Of Secrets

For Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets I knew I wanted to focus on Ginny. Because Ginny is the best and the movies do her no justice. Ginny survived being possessed by Voldemort. Ginny is a super talented witch. Ginny doesn't let anyone tell her what to do. Team Ginny! Sorry, I get excited about my favorite Weasley. Basically, this is a look I can picture Ginny rocking at school. 

For the outfit let's start with some Gryffindor panties first, then toss on a vibrant, phoenix-red mini skirt with a comfy, oversized "Ginny" sweater. Pull on some over-the-knee Hogwarts crest socks because socks are very important to this story. *sniff* Dobby *sniff*. Finally, pull on a pair of "Elf" booties and grab your car handbag before the Whomping Willow gets to it.

Moving onto accessories we have a phoenix phone case, naturally. A spider watch on your wrist, a diary key necklace and a toilet necklace (I'm sorry, but I'm so in love with this one) around your neck, a pair of broomstick earrings dangling from your ears, and a Slytherin-worthy snake ring complete the look.

Anybody else share my love of Ginny? Do you hate movie Ginny as much as I do? Does anyone else think Bonnie Wright made an adorable younger Ginny but didn't really grow into the role well?


Book Review: The Casual Vacancy

I loved this book because it is still J.K. Rowling in all of her easy-to-read, witty glory but it is so different from Harry Potter. A lot of people will probably hate this book for that very same reason. But I am absolutely thrilled that the author of one of the best fantasy series ever (my humble opinion and all that...) has proved her worth as an author yet again by putting together such a large book, in scope and in size, that captivates without a single touch of fantasy and some very heavy doses of bitter reality.

Yeah, I know, Harry Potter did touch on some very real subjects like death, abuse, and racism but the fantasy setting leavened the moral lessons for the young adult set. The Casual Vacancy pulls no such punches. The reality of life and all the disenchantment that can entail slaps you right across the face from the opening chapter. Like The Snow Child, I'm going to warn you that this book is not a happy-go-lucky, feel good book. It's bittersweet; although it didn't reduce me to uncontrollable sobs, it did make me rather pensive and misty-eyed. POSSIBLE SPOILER ALERT: It ends just like it begins, with a funeral.

It would be nearly impossible for me to accurately summarize the plot, there are so many story lines interwoven with each other and so many great (and sometimes gut-wrenchingly broken) characters involved. The plot revolves around the untimely death of a local councilman and the subsequent election for his empty council seat, but there is so much more involved. This is really a novel about relationships: parents and children, kids and their friends, in-laws, husbands and wives, and sometimes people with their memories.

Yep, life can suck and be hard and be so accurately transcribed to paper.

I was most definitely pleased with Ms. Rowling's foray into adult fiction. I say "bravo"!